Toxic Masculinity to Blame for Climate Change? (THE SAAD TRUTH_884)

I use the Aslan-Uygur Decoder 5000 latest feature that allows you to generate new titles for your social justice warrior articles.

Archived link to the Forbes article: http://archive.is/lvNem

Current version of the Forbes article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/carolyncenteno/2019/04/03/what-if-toxic-masculinity-is-the-reason-for-climate-change/#58431dae37e4
[notice the term ‘toxic masculinity’ in the url.]

JCR paper that is covered in the Forbes article: https://bit.ly/2Mbx20Y

Feminist Glaciology paper: https://bit.ly/2DM0F3L
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Gad Saad

Dr. Gad Saad is Professor of Marketing, holder of the Concordia University Research Chair in Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences and Darwinian Consumption, and advisory fellow at the Center for Inquiry. He was an Associate Editor of Evolutionary Psychology (2012-2015) and of Customer Needs and Solutions (2014- ). He has held Visiting Associate Professorships at Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and the University of California-Irvine. Dr. Saad was inducted into the Who’s Who of Canadian Business in 2002. He was listed as one of the “hot” professors of Concordia University in both the 2001 and 2002 Maclean’s reports on Canadian universities. Dr. Saad received the JMSB Faculty’s Distinguished Teaching Award in June 2000. He is the recipient of the 2014 Darwinism Applied Award granted by the Applied Evolutionary Psychology Society and co-recipient of the 2015 President's Media Outreach Award-Research Communicator (International). His research and teaching interests include evolutionary psychology, consumer behavior, and psychology of decision making.